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Child Support Archives

Should I modify my child custody arrangement?

When divorced parents in Texas decide that your current child custody arrangement does not suit your evolving needs, the Law Offices of Keith E. Holloway can step in to help guide you to a new arrangement that benefits all parties equally, or as close to equal as possible.

Do I have to pay child support if I lose my job?

If you have filed for a divorce in Texas, you likely have many questions. One of the most confusing topics for most divorcing parents is child support and all the rules that govern this program. Many wonder whether they will still be required to make payments if they lose their job and become incapable of providing financial support for their children. The Texas Attorney General has answered this question as well as many others on the topic of child custody.

Understanding Texas child support laws

Child support is a legal obligation in Texas. Once a judge has signed an order of child support, the noncustodial parent is required to pay the specified amount of child support to the custodial parent of his or her children or to the person who has primary custody of them. Under the Texas Family Code, failure to do so can result in the specified periodic payment being withheld from the disposable earnings of the obligor; i.e., the parent required to pay.

Steps to get child support

If you are going through a divorce in Texas and need to secure child support, there are several steps you should take. We at the Law Offices of Keith E. Holloway can help you accomplish everything you need to do and fight for your rights during your court case.

What don't child support payments go toward?

Parents who divorce in Texas are still left with one major and long-lasting issue that they need to cooperate together to work through: how they're going to pay to raise their child well. Child support payments are meant to help spread out the financial burden, but unfortunately, there are a lot of expenses that child support doesn't cover.

Divorced parents and college tuition

Parents who are getting divorced in Texas and have children that someday may go to college will want to understand a bit how this process might work. Even if college is many years away from the time of a divorce, it can be very important to look ahead. As explained by FastWeb, a college-bound student information website, there is no legal requirement for either parent to fund a child's college education.

Using 401K money to pay child support

When getting divorced in Texas, parents who are ordered to pay child support as part of their divorce settlement may often wonder how they will be able to manage such payments. The financial impact of a divorce and the increased cost of living alone versus with someone else can take a bit out of a person's income and even savings. When considering different options, a retirement account may be one option.

Texas car registration withheld with unpaid child support

Unpaid child support is an issue across the nation, but Texas officials have found one way to help remedy the problem. According to CBS DFW, parents with unpaid child support bills are unable to renew their car’s registration. With approximately one million parents across the state responsible for making child support payments, almost half of them are behind in payments by one month or more. Mothers are often the primary custodial parent, and in Texas 48 percent of single mothers and their children have incomes below the poverty line.

How does child support work in Texas?

Are you the divorcing parent of a child in Texas? If so, you or your future former spouse may be required to make child support payments. Whether you are the parent who is ordered to pay support or the parent who may receive such support, it is important for you to understand a few things about these requirements in Texas.

Can you deduct child support on your tax return?

In recognition that tax season is fast approaching, this blog will publish a few posts about the intersection of taxes and family law issues. This post will go over how child support is treated on your tax return. Child support is payments given by one spouse to the other parent. It is meant as a way to provide replace "care" that the paying spouse would normally provide. Child support payments are thus, nominally, "given" to the child but in reality, you remit them to the parent who is supposed to expend them on the child?s care.

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